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Spelling: The Doubling Rule

The English language has rules that we must follow to spell words correctly. In reality about 85% of the English language is phonetically reliable for spelling. It is up to us as educators to explicitly explain and model these rules.
The Doubling Rule 


The Doubling Rule

When adding a vowel suffix to a one syllable base word ending in a short vowel and one consonant, you must double the final consonant before adding the vowel suffix.

Click here, if you would like a free printable of the Doubling Rule.

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FLoSS Spelling Rule

We know how important being able to spell correctly is for a student to express himself through writing and get his ideas across to the reader. Teaching students spelling rules is critical to writing fluency. My goal is to make teaching spelling rules easy and understandable to students so that they can apply it to their own writing.

The FLoSS Spelling Rule basically states that in any one syllable base word that has a short vowel sound before final (f) is spelled ff as in sniff, final (l) is spelled ll as in hill, or final (s) is spelled ss as in pass.

Even though, there are a few exceptions to this rule, it is extremely important to teach it because it is about 85% correct. It is easier to apply this rule and memorize the 15% that is the exception rather than memorize the spelling for each word.

To help you teach the FLoSS Spelling Rule, I have made a video. You can access it here:


After teaching the FLoSS Spelling Rule, I have made a FLoSS Spelling Rule Game that you can play with …